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Counting Coins

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Team Digital

Basics on the topic Counting Coins

Join Freddie and Zuri and help them with counting coins.

Transcript Counting Coins

Freddie and Zuri are so excited! "I can't believe we found three piggy banks in the dump today, we're going to be millionaires!" "I'm going to get a race car with my coins!" "Well, I'm going to get a diamond ring with mine!" Hold on just one second, Zuri and Freddie. Don't you think you should learn about counting coins before you go spending that money? Remember, coins are little, flat pieces of money made from metal. The coins we use are a range of colours, shapes and sizes. They all have different values. In the United Kingdom we use eight main coins. Six of them are worth pence and two of them are worth pounds. To represent pence we use a letter p and to represent pounds we use this symbol. The coins we use are a one p, a two p, a five p, a ten p, a twenty p, a fifty p, a one pound and a two pound coin. Let's use the first piggy bank to review the steps for counting coins. First, order the coins from greatest to least by writing the value of each one below it. How could we order the amount here from greatest to least? Fifty p, twenty p, ten p, ten p, five p and one p. Next, set up an equation by adding all of the values together. Then, solve the equation by adding up the values. Finally, put a p next to the answer to represent pence. Now that the first piggy bank is sorted, let's count the coins in Freddie's bank. First, order the coins from greatest to least by writing the value of each one below it. Freddie's order is twenty p, twenty p, five p, five p, two p, two p and one p. Next, set up an equation by adding all of the values together. Then, solve the equation by adding up all of the numbers. Finally, put a p next to the answer since this represents pence. Freddie has fifty-five pence to spend! Let's help Zuri count her coins! What is her first step? First, she must order her coins from greatest to least by writing the value of each one below. Zuri's order is fifty p, ten p, five p, two p, one p and another one p. What will Zuri do next? Next, she'll set up an addition equation to add the values of each coin together. How can Zuri solve the problem? She can add up all of the values to get sixty-nine. There's one last step Zuri needs to remember, what is it? She must remember to put a p next to sixty-nine. Zuri has sixty-nine pence! Before we see what Freddie and Zuri can afford, let's remember! Today we learnt about counting coins in the United Kingdom. The coins we use are a one p, a two p, a five p, a ten p, a twenty p, a fifty p, a one pound and a two pound coin. To count coins, first, order them from greatest to least by writing their values beneath. Next, set up an addition equation to add the values of each coin together. Then solve by adding all of the values together. Don't forget to write p after your total to represent pence! "Well...we might not have had enough for exactly what we wanted ... " Yeah....but we got pretty close!"

Counting Coins exercise

Would you like to apply the knowledge you’ve learnt? You can review and practice it with the tasks for the video Counting Coins.
  • Identify the coins.

    Hints

    The faces, size and colour of a coin can help us identify which coin it is.

    The coins that have a value in pounds are gold and silver in colour.

    The two coins with the lowest values are copper in colour.

    A 20 p coin is smaller than a 50 p coin and a 5 p coin is smaller than a 10 p coin.

    Solution

    Here we can see the coins with their correct values.

  • Can you find the coins that have been ordered correctly?

    Hints

    Remember to put all your coins in a straight line and pair matching coins.

    The coins should be in order from greatest to lowest. Put the value of each coin under the coin.

    This image shows the coins in order from lowest to greatest value.

    Solution

    The image above shows the correct order of Freddie's and Zuri's coins. The correct order starts with the greatest value coins and ends with the lowest value coins.

    These coins are in the correct order:

    • 50 p, 20 p, 20 p, 2 p, 1 p
    • £1, 20 p, 20 p, 10 p, 10 p, 5 p, 1 p
    These coins are not in the correct order:

    • 50 p, £1, 20 p, 2 p, 5 p, 10 p
    • 20 p, 50 p, £2, 50 p, £1, 2 p, 2 p.
  • Count the coins.

    Hints

    Remember the value of each coin and write the value underneath the coins in the problem.

    Write your answer using digits. For example "87."

    Use paper and a pencil to write your addition equations and find the total.

    Solution
    1. 50 p + 10 p + 10 p + 5 p + 1 p = 76 p
    2. 20 p + 20 p + 20 p + 2 p + 1p + 1 p = 64 p
    3. 10 p + 10 p + 10 p + 5 p + 5 p + 5 p + 2p = 47 p
    4. 50 p + 20 p + 10 p + 5 p + 2p + 1 p = 88 p
  • Compare the coins.

    Hints

    When comparing use the symbols > (greater than), < (less than) or = (equal to).

    The open section should face the larger number. For example, 10 > 7 or 4 < 9.

    Here are the coin values to help you count them up.

    Solution

    Row 1 shows 25 p is greater than 22 p

    Row 2 shows 60 p is equal to 60 p

    Row 3 shows 67 p is greater than 64 p

    Row 4 shows 47 p is less than 50 p

  • Count the coins.

    Hints

    Use this image to help you order and count the coins above.

    The first two coins are both 20 p. We will start our addition 20 + 20. Continue adding each coin.

    Solve the addition problem:

    20 + 20 + 10 + 5 + 5 + 2 + 2 + 1 =

    Solution

    The image above shows the coins in order from greatest to lowest value.

    After ordering the coins, create an addition equation with the values.

    This set's equation should be:

    • 20 + 20 + 10 + 5 + 5 + 2 + 2 + 1 = 65 p

  • Chose the correct amount of coins.

    Hints

    Start with the greatest value coin - how many 20 p coins can fit into 65 p?

    How much do you still need to make? How can this value be made with 2 p and 1 p coins?

    Solution

    Another way to make 65 p is:

    • 20 p = 3
    • 2 p = 2
    • 1 p = 1
    20 + 20 + 20 + 2 + 2 + 1 = 65