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Writing Statements

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Basics on the topic Writing Statements

Learn how to write a statement by starting with the main idea and then giving a fact about this.

Transcript Writing Statements

Jane is getting ready to cover the big race. She knows a lot about racing cars, but Ernie does not. So, Jane wants to teach him more about it before race day, but how? Let's help Jane by learning about writing statements. Authors write for many different reasons, but one reason is to tell true information about something. When you write it down in a sentence, it's called a statement. This means you are writing facts about real people, places, or things. facts are ideas that are true, not just a feeling, or opinion. 'The sky is blue' is a fact because you can prove it to be true. 'Blue is the best colour' is not a fact because it's a feeling about someone's likes. To write a statement, we can fill in this sentence: The blank is blank. First, we ask, what am I writing about? We call this our main idea and write it in the first space here. Then we ask, what do I know about the main idea that's true? We call this our fact and write it in the second space here. When we put the main idea and the fact together in our sentence, we make a statement! Let's help Jane write one to teach Ernie about the race! First, we ask, what is Jane writing about? She is writing about the racing car. So we write ‘racing car’ here. Then, we ask, what does Jane know about the racing car that's true? It's fast! So we write ‘fast’ here. Jane's first sentence informs, or teaches, Ernie that the racing car is fast. Let's try it again but this time Jane wants to teach him about the race track. First, we ask, what is Jane writing about? She is writing about the race track. So we write ‘race track’ here. Then, we ask, what does Jane know about the track that's true? It's an oval! So we write 'an oval' here. Jane's second sentence informs Ernie that the race track is an oval. Finally, Jane wants to teach Ernie who wins. First, we ask, what is Jane writing about? She is writing about the winner. Where should we write ‘winner’? Here! Then, we ask, what does Jane know about the winner that's true? They are first! So where should we write ‘first’? Here! Jane's last sentence informs Ernie that the winner is first. While Jane finishes writing, let's remember! Today we learned about writing statements. They tell facts about real people, places, or things. To write a statement, first, we ask, what am I writing about? The main idea. Then, we ask, what do I know about it that's true? The fact. When we put the main idea and the fact together in our sentence we make a statement! "Wow, car racing sounds like so much fun.I'll be right back." "This will only take a minute!"

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  1. I liked how you explained this topic and subject

    From Tommy, 3 months ago

Writing Statements exercise

Would you like to apply the knowledge you’ve learnt? You can review and practice it with the tasks for the video Writing Statements.
  • What are statements?

    Hints

    Here is an example of a statement:

    The sky is blue.

    Is the statement above true or false?

    Solution

    Statements are facts that are true.

  • How is a statement formed?

    Hints

    Things we know to be true are called facts.

    Here is a statement:

    The grass is green.

    Solution

    When we put the main idea and the fact together in our sentence, we make a statement.

  • Can you help Jane complete the statements?

    Hints

    Is yellow gives us information about the colour of the banana.

    What can you see in the sky?

    Solution

    The correct answers are:

    • The banana is yellow.
    • The ball is round.
    • The sky is cloudy.
    • The snail is slow.
  • Is the sentence a statement?

    Hints

    Do you think everybody thinks oranges are the most delicious fruit?

    'The car is red.' is a fact because you can prove it to be true.

    Solution

    The statements are:

    • I completed three tasks.
    • The car is red.
    • My brother is eight.
  • Which of these sentences are statements?

    Hints

    Some people might think that summer is the best season but not everybody so this is not a fact.

    If the sentence begins with I think, it is likely to be an opinion.

    Solution

    The correct answers are:

    The weather is snowy.

    There are five blueberries in the bowl.

  • Which sentences are statements?

    Hints

    Remember, statements are facts that are true.

    If someone says something is the best, that is their opinion and is not a true fact.

    There are three statements.

    Solution

    These sentences are statements:

    • The table is wooden.
    • The weather is sunny.
    • There are three apples in the bowl.
    These sentences are not statements:

    • Chocolate ice cream is the best flavour.
    • Friday is the best day of the week.
    • I love going swimming.