Try sofatutor for 30 Days

Discover why over 1.6 MILLION pupils choose sofatutor!

Complete Sentence, Fragment, or Run-on?

Do you want to learn faster and more easily?

Then why not use our learning videos, and practice for school with learning games.

Try for 30 Days
Rating

Ø 3.5 / 4 ratings
The authors
Avatar
Team Digital

Basics on the topic Complete Sentence, Fragment, or Run-on?

Learn what makes a complete sentence and what is a fragment or run-on.

Transcript Complete Sentence, Fragment, or Run-on?

Koko is cleaning her, erm, already clean house, when suddenly she has an idea for her next blog post! It doesn't take long for Koko to finish eight hundred and ninety-two ways to clean using lemons! But it looks like she needs to make some changes before she publishes her post. Let's help Koko by deciding if she's written a complete sentence, fragment or run-on. A complete sentence is a set of words that make up a complete thought. It always has a subject and verb, and it always starts with a capital letter and ends with punctuation. For example, 'Koko loves to clean.' is a complete sentence. If we remove the subject, 'Koko', from the sentence, 'loves to clean.', it is now a sentence fragment. A sentence fragment is a string of words that cannot convey a complete thought because it is missing the subject or verb. While a sentence fragment doesn't give the reader enough information, a run-on sentence gives too much information. A run-on sentence is made up of two independent clauses, or complete sentences. For example, 'Koko loves to clean she wrote a blog post about how much she loves it.', is a run-on sentence. There are two complete thoughts here: she loves to clean and she wrote a blog post about how much she loves it. We can correct a run-on sentence by separating it into two complete sentences such as: Koko loves to clean. She wrote a blog post about how much she loves it. Or we can add a conjunction to join the two ideas. Let's try it: Koko loves to clean so she wrote a blog post about how much she loves it. Now that we've learned about complete sentences, fragments and run-ons, let's look at Koko's writing! Tip number forty-eight says: Lemons can be used to make an easy air freshener all you have to do is put some peels in water. Is this a complete sentence, fragment, or run-on? This is a run-on sentence because there are two independent clauses that need to be separated by a full stop or joined using a conjunction. How do we fix it? This time we will separate them into two complete sentences using a full stop. Let's look at another. Tip number one hundred and six says: Are good for cleaning hard water stains. Is this a complete sentence, fragment or run-on? This is a fragment because the subject is missing. How do we fix it? By adding the subject 'Lemons' we can make it a complete sentence! Rule number four hundred and ninety-one says: Lemon juice cuts through the grime it leaves toilet bowls sparkling. Is this a complete sentence, fragment or run-on? This is a run-on sentence because there are two independent clauses. How do we fix it? This time we will join them by adding the conjunction ‘and’ here. Let's try one more. Tip number eight hundred and ninety-two says: Lemon polish great. Is this a complete sentence, fragment or run-on? This is a fragment because the verb is missing. How do we fix it? By adding the verb ‘smells’ we can make it a complete sentence! While Koko finalises her post, let's summarise! Remember, a complete sentence is a set of words that make up a complete thought. To make a run-on sentence a complete sentence, you can split it into two sentences or add a conjunction to connect them. To make a sentence fragment a complete sentence, revise, or change it by adding what's missing. "Yes, already three likes! Pip did you see my new post!? What do you think?!" "It's great! Except, you mentioned all these ways we can use lemons but have you ever tried just eating one!?"