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Adages and Proverbs

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Basics on the topic Adages and Proverbs

Let's learn about adages and proverbs with Koko and Pip.

Transcript Adages and Proverbs

Koko and Pip are embarking on a journey. If they complete their journey, they will each receive one wish from the mystical Jeremiah. He's set up some adages, and proverbs to help them, but to complete their journey, they need to know: What are Adages and Proverbs? Adages and proverbs are sayings that tell a truth or give advice. They are types of figurative language. Remember, figurative language is a word or phrase that does not have the exact meaning of the words written. For example, 'many hands make light work'. When trying to figure out the meaning, think: what is the author trying to say? The work isn't actually getting any lighter, it means tasks can be completed more easily when more people work together! Let's look at another example. Every cloud has a silver lining.' What is the author trying to say? This doesn't mean that clouds actually have silver around the outside, it means that in every bad situation, there is the possibility of something good. Let's take a look at the adages and proverbs Jeremiah left for Pip and Koko, and determine their meanings. The first one says: The early bird catches the worm. What is the author trying to say? Being first, or starting early, improves the chances of success on their journey. The next tip says: The grass is always greener on the other side. What is the author trying to say? It can often feel like things that other people have or are doing, always seem to be better than your own situation. Let's take a look at another tip: When you want to make an omelette, you need to break a few eggs. What is the author trying to say? Reaching a goal requires making sacrifices. The last tip says: When the going gets tough, the tough get going. What is the author trying to say? When it becomes difficult to complete a task or goal, strong people persevere and work hard. Now that Koko and Pip have figured out what the adages and proverbs mean, they can start their journey! While they do that, let's review. Remember, adages and proverbs are sayings that tell a truth or give advice. While reading, think: what is the author trying to say? Then, explain in your own words the literal meaning of the phrase. Koko and Pip completed the journey, now they can make their wish! “ After that long journey, I wish for a mint choc chip ice cream!” "Oh boy, okay okay, I wish we could do the whole journey all over again because it was so much fun!"

Adages and Proverbs exercise

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  • Find the true sentences.

    Hints

    'It is raining cats and dogs' is an example of figurative language.

    There are three true choices and one incorrect choice.

    Adages and proverbs have a message or point to share.

    Solution

    TRUE

    • Adages and proverbs are types of figurative language.
    • In figurative language, the meaning of the text is not the same as the exact literal meaning of the words.
    • Adages and proverbs are intended to tell a truth or give advice.
    FALSE
    • Adages and proverbs are intentionally made to be confusing. Adages and proverbs may sometimes be confusing, but they are not intentionally made to be so.

  • Find the meaning of the proverb or adage.

    Hints

    Adages and proverbs are meant to share truths or lessons. Read the proverb again. What kind of moral, lesson or advice might the author be trying to share?

    "When the going gets tough, the tough get going" is saying that sometimes we may find things difficult. What is a good way to react when something is difficult?

    Keeping in mind that birds like worms, what is the advantage of getting up early in the proverb, "The early bird catches the worm"?

    Solution
    • The meaning of the early bird catches the worm is that when you get started early, you have a greater chance of success.
    • The meaning of if you want to make an omelette, you need to break a few eggs is that achieving your goal requires making sacrifices.
    • The meaning of when the going gets tough, the tough get going is that when a goal or task becomes difficult to achieve, strong people persevere and work hard.
    • The meaning of you catch more flies with honey than vinegar is that people are more likely to help you when you are kind to them.
  • Which sentences are examples of figurative language and which aren't?

    Hints

    This is an example of a sentence that doesn't have figurative language:

    There is one red bird and one blue bird.

    In this example, the meaning of the sentence is exactly the meaning of the words.

    This is an example of a sentence that uses figurative language:

    He runs as fast as the wind.

    It means he runs very, very fast, but it is impossible for a person to actually be as fast as the wind.

    Solution

    Figurative language

    • Every cloud has a silver lining.
    • A picture is worth a thousand words.
    Not figurative language

    • I fixed my bicycle yesterday.
    • There are many photos of my birthday.
  • Expain the meaning of the proverb.

    Hints

    Adages and proverbs are meant to share truths or lessons. What type of advice do you think the author is trying to share?

    In the proverb "The apple does not fall far from the tree", what does the tree stand for? What is the apple?

    In the proverb "Don't bite the hand that feeds you", think of what kind of reaction this is to someone who has offered you help or a gift.

    Solution
    • You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink.
    • This means you can help someone to do something, but you cannot force them.*
    • The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.
    • This means what someone else has always seems more attractive.*
    • The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.
    • This means a child grows up to be similar to their parents.*
    • Don’t bite the hand that feeds you.
    • This means do not act badly towards someone who has helped you.*
  • Find the meaning of the proverb.

    Hints

    Adages and proverbs are meant to share truths or lessons. Read the proverb again. What kind of moral or lesson might the author be trying to share?

    This proverb is talking about tasks, not necessarily lifting objects.

    When you are faced with a difficult job, it is often made easier when other people help.

    Solution

    Many hands make light work actually means that difficult tasks are completed more easily with many people working together.

  • Find the meaning of the proverb or adage.

    Hints

    Adages and proverbs are types of figurative language. This means the meaning of the proverb is not the same as the literal meaning of the words used.

    Adages and proverbs are meant to share truths or lessons. Read the proverb again. What kind of moral, lesson or advice might the author be trying to share?

    Even though glass can be expensive to replace, this isn't the meaning of an adage or proverb shown.

    Solution
    • "Rome wasn't built in a day" means work that is important takes time.
    • "Don’t count your chickens before they hatch" means you should not make plans for money or other resources you have not yet received.
    • "People who live in glass houses should not throw stones" means if you have any weaknesses yourself, you should not point out or judge the faults of other people.
    • "Good things comes to those who wait" means stay patient, eventually something good will happen to you.