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Organising data (How many data points? How many more?)

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Basics on the topic Organising data (How many data points? How many more?)

Collecting and Organising Data

What is collecting and organising data? Data is information we can collect and sort to help us organise and understand facts, numbers, and measurements. We can practise collecting data in two ways:

The first way is by observing, which means using our eyes to look at the data. The second way is to ask questions to collect more information about the data.

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Collecting and Organising Data – Example

Sometimes when we collect data there is a lot and it's hard to answer questions if the information is all mixed up. If we organise data into a chart, that can help answer questions more easily. For example, if we need to find out how many circles there are we first organise the shapes by putting them into categories.

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Now that we've organised the shapes into categories, we can look at the data with our eyes to find the answer. Even though we see circles, squares, and triangles, always remember what the question is asking: how many circles are there?

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If you look at the chart and count, you will see that there are three circles!

Shape Number
Squares 3
Triangles 3
Circles 3

Collecting and Organising Data – Summary

Data is information we can collect and sort to help us understand facts, numbers, and measurements. Sometimes the data is mixed up so we organise it into categories to help us answer questions about the data.

Want some more collecting and organising data practise? On this website there is a collecting and organising data worksheet along with other activities, and exercises.

Transcript Organising data (How many data points? How many more?)

"Nice hit Gus!" "Before we start eating, let's organise and collect data on the sweets so we can share them fairly." Collecting and Organizing Data. Data is information that we can collect. We can sort or organise data to help us understand facts, numbers and measurements. How do we collect data? We can collect data in two ways. The first way is by observing, which means using our eyes to look at the data. The second way is to ask questions to collect more information about the data. Sometimes when we've collected a lot of data, it can be hard to answer questions if the information is all mixed up. Organising the data in a chart can help us to answer questions more easily. For example, if we need to find out how many circles there are, first we need to organise the shapes by putting them into categories. What different shapes can you see? There are squares, triangles and circles. Let's organise them into a chart. We can put all the squares here, the triangles here and the circles here. Now that we've organised the shapes into categories, we can look at the data to find the answer. Even though we can see circles, squares and triangles, always remember what the question is asking: how many circles are there? Let's count the circles together: one, two, three! There are three circles. Now that we've practised collecting and organising data let's help Gus and Nari! They need help figuring out how many sweets they have, but they're all mixed up with the bouncy balls and rubber ducks! Let's use this chart to organise the shapes into different categories! We can put all the rubber ducks here, the bouncy balls here and the sweets here. Even though we can see bouncy balls, rubber ducks and sweets, always remember what the question is asking: how many sweets do they have? Let's count together: one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight! Gus and Nari will share eight sweets. Before they do that, let's remember. Data is information we can collect and sort to help us understand facts, numbers and measurements. Sometimes the data is mixed up so we organise it into categories to help us answer questions about the data. "Alright Gus, now that we've sorted the sweets we can..." "Gus! That wasn't a sweet, that was a rubber duck!"

Organising data (How many data points? How many more?) exercise

Would you like to apply the knowledge you’ve learnt? You can review and practice it with the tasks for the video Organising data (How many data points? How many more?).
  • Highlight the data.

    Hints

    The food items are our data. We are organising it using different colour highlighters.

    Solution

    Here we can see each food item highlighted to help us to organise our data.

  • How many of each item are there?

    Hints

    Look at how many of each item is highlighted. Remember:

    • tomatoes are highlighted in green.
    • cheese is highlighted in blue.
    • meatballs are highlighted in yellow.

    We can see 6 tomatoes.

    Solution
    • There are 6 tomatoes.
    • There are 3 meatballs.
    • There are 5 pieces of cheese.
  • Answer the questions using the data.

    Hints

    To find how many of each item there are, you can read the number from the table.

    To find out how many more tomatoes there are than pieces of cheese, we need to subtract 5 (pieces of cheese) from 6 (tomatoes).

    • 6 - 5 = ?

    To find out how many fewer meatballs there are than pieces of cheese, we need to subtract 3 (meatballs) from 5 (pieces of cheese).

    • 5 - 3 = ?

    To find out how many food items there are altogether, we need to add each total.

    • 6 + 3 + 5 = ?
    Solution
    1. How many tomatoes are there? 6
    2. How many meatballs are there? 3
    3. How many pieces of cheese are there? 5
    4. How many more tomatoes than pieces of cheese are there? 1
    5. How many fewer meatballs than pieces of cheese are there? 2
    6. How many food items are there altogether? 14
  • Have Nari and Gus organised their data correctly?

    Hints

    Count how many of each sweet you can see.

    Does the number you counted match Nari and Gus'? If not, highlight it.

    Solution

    Oh dear, Nari and Gus had miscounted a few of their data points:

    • There were 7 gummy bears, not 8, so that was incorrect.
    • There were 5 lollipops, so that was correct.
    • There were 8 red sweets, not 7, so that was incorrect
    • There were 4 yellow sweets, not 3, so that was incorrect.
  • How many blue sweets are there?

    Hints

    Remember, it is just the total number of blue sweets you are looking for here.

    You are looking for all of the sweets like this one. How many are there altogether?

    Solution

    There are 5 blue sweets.

  • Can you assign the data correctly?

    Hints

    Carefully count each item. Maybe you could create a table like this before you assign each item.

    Once you know how many of each flower there are, you can assign it to the correct number.

    Solution

    Here are the totals of each flower:

    • There were 8 tulips.
    • There were 7 daffodils.
    • There were 8 daisies.
    • There were 3 roses.